The Greyshirts Tackle Advanced Stats

It went pretty much as expected.

I stirred things up on Twitter this morning by asking my esteemed colleagues to name their favorite advanced baseball metrics. After kicking around a couple of ideas, the conversation turned into a discussion about hitting, stat keeping, and usefulness of “popular” metrics like WAR(P). I compiled the saga on Storify, but WordPress won’t let me embed it here for your viewing pleasure. So, the link is included in the post.

https://storify.com/JGavinHawkins/bench-points-stat-debate

Advertisements

One thought on “The Greyshirts Tackle Advanced Stats

Add yours

  1. Thanks for the feedback. A lot of the complexities are lost on us as well. What is relevant is the context of the statistic. For instance, WAR(P) is a convoluted equation that projects in wins how much better player A is than the next best player that could replace him. Stats like WHIP grade pitchers and show on average how many batters reach base per inning by walking or getting a hit. The other stats have similar applications. The key for us has been not necessarily to always understand the methodology that spits out the number, but the context around what the number is meant to measure.

    Baseball-reference.com is great for the definitions of the stats and telling you what they seek to measure.

    Baseball has always been a Big Data game, never more so than now either. Thanks again for your comment. I hope you keep reading, we promise that all the posts aren’t designed to lose the reader. 😉

    -Gavin

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: